Grooming Patience through Community, Waiting on God, and the Order of Numbers

Last week, the firsties groomed patience through the Biblical account of Joseph. They learned that although life may seem like a roller coaster, God is ALWAYS working for the good of those who love Him (Romans 8:28). Joseph experienced many hardships throughout his life: his brothers sold him into slavery, his boss’ wife slandered him, and he was tossed into prison an innocent man. Although things probably seemed impossible to overcome, Joseph never relinquished his faith. He trusted that through the good and the bad, God was with him, divining a larger purpose for him. He was patient, and waited on God to provide for him.

In art, we completed a collage to illustrate the beginning of Joseph’s story. Each child created their own colorful coat design using tissue paper!

Through readers workshop, the firsties practiced word work. A “must-do” activity allows them to practice word building and solving skills at their own developmental level as they progress through more challenging skills. They can then make a “can-do” choice, including reading, writing, and stamping pattern or sight words, finding, reading and writing words they see around the room, building words with magnetic letters or letter beads, placing words in ABC order, attending to one letter at a time through rainbow writing words, and rolling dice to construct words using an onset and rime. Word Work is the final independent workshop choice first graders learn; next week students will begin rotating through multiple work stations each day! The firsties also focused on identifying and using fiction and nonfiction texts and began using their schema to make connections to the books they are reading.

The firsties are continuing to work on their personal narratives during writers workshop. Last week, they learned to work with a partner to plan their stories, checking for beginning/middle/end, beginning capitals, ending punctuation, logical spelling attempts, and sufficient details. They read one another their stories and used rubrics and checklists to ensure the inclusion of every important part. Students will continue writing and editing their personal narratives while many are publishing stories!

Math Workshop gave the firsties the opportunity to apply what they have learned about decomposing numbers to solve and illustrate word problems, use place value concepts, and demonstrate building and writing numbers in both standard and expanded form. This solidifies their understanding of our base-ten numerical system as well as place value, setting the foundation for working with much larger numbers in the future. They are also continuing to track the days of the year, reinforcing place value concepts by bundling straws in groups of ten and regrouping coins by 5s and 10s. The most popular calendar time activity is still allowing children to create their own difficult questions about the passage of time. What month will it be in 80 days? Do you know? The firsties figured it out last week!

In music, students practiced good singing posture and learned about their diaphragm. They learned that when breathing correctly, their lower abdomen should expand while their shoulders stay still. Take a deep breath. Notice what your chest does. Notice what your shoulders do. For proper breath support, your chest and shoulders should stay relatively still! Is your abdomen moving? If so, good! You’re breathing correctly! The firsties loved pretending to be Hayden’s snooty and proper audience members when listening again to the Surprise Symphony. They learned all about his life, then practiced being surprised when the dynamics changed.

Just like Uncle Jed, we are all part of a community, not only at school but also in our neighborhoods, cities, state, and country. The first graders listened to a story about a little house that was happy living in the country, but as time passed and the city grew around it, it noticed all the changes that were happening that made life different. The firsties compared and contrasted three types of communities: rural, urban, and suburban. They watched video examples of each and described what made each unique. They began working on projects to illustrate each type of community, which will expand into next week, when they will begin the research they need for their class project.

The firsties experienced what they called their favorite PE game on Friday. Ask what happens when you get hit with a rotten egg!!

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Patience Gives

This quarter in the Patience Fruit Stand, the firsties are investigating what it means to serve. We’re looking at those who serve in the Bible, and reading and studying Miss Rumphius. How did she serve? Who, in the Bible, is she most like?

We learned that Paul and Barnabas traveled far and wide to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We wondered, how is that an act of service? What acts of service could we perform for others? How could we be the hands and feet of Jesus?

In writers workshop, we have been reading and writing narratives, more specifically, realistic fiction. We’ve been reading LOTS of example stories, called mentor texts, we use as models for good writing, allowing us to write stories with details about characters’ actions and mood, setting descriptions, realistic problems and solutions, and most importantly, stories that make sense from beginning to end!

In readers workshop, we’ve been looking at non-fiction text features and how they help our comprehension. We’ve been identifying and using tables of contents, headings, photographs and illustrations, captions, glossaries, and indices to prepare us for our next step: creating our own non-fiction texts using the same features!

In math workshop, we’ve been reviewing hour and half-hour time concepts and practicing quarter-hour time. This week we are reviewing money and coin-counting. Great ways to practice these skills at home include asking students to tell the time using analog clocks, then asking what the time will be after some time has passed. For example, if it is 3:00, ask what time it will be in two hours. If it is 12:30, ask what time it will be in half an hour. Students can also count coins at home, or be given a pile of coins and asked to make the same amount a different way.

Science and social studies have us exploring features of the earth and mapping concepts. We’ve been working on a project to develop our idea of location by zooming in to our own home from outer space! We also celebrated Earth Day by creating a recycled book!

TerraNova testing continues this week. Parents, thank you so much for having students at school on time and ready for each day. They are working so hard and doing so well!

Check out these guys who were awarded Oil Lamp and Oil Jar last week for collaboration. What a great example!

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Patterns, Patterns Everywhere!

This week, the Patience Fruit Stand has been filled with patterns! Firsties have been noticing patterns in the world around them, identifying and classifying patterns, extending patterns, discovering patterns in sound, and playing pattern games.

Patterns in numbers

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Patterns in sound

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Patterns in words

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Patterns in writing

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Patterns in reading

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Patterns in color

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Patterns in counting the number of shakes it takes to make butter in a jar . . .

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Sharing & Giving

Sharing is hard. Right? And it can be hard for everyone, not just little ones. For example, as parents, we find ourselves sharing all that we have with our children. We share our food, our stuff, our bed space, our time, and our love. Sometimes, as a mom, I want to not share (especially my food and sleep – ha!). I want those precious hours of uninterrupted REM to myself, or to simply eat a peaceful meal without hearing “Mommymommymommymommy” 100 times in a row, but ultimately we do share the things we have because we love our children unconditionally and want to put them first. Even when our energy is low, our plates are nearly empty, and our patience is wearing thin; we give.

How much more does our Heavenly Father give to us? In the Patience Fruit Stand, we’ve been learning about the ways Jesus shows us how to live. When he fed the 5,000, the Bible says he was originally headed to a place to rest. He was tired. He’d been traveling and teaching, and honestly, he probably just wanted to grab a nap and some food. But when the people found out where he was going, they went there too, and suddenly Jesus was in the presence of a huge crowd of people. Did he turn them away? Did he remind them of his busy speaking schedule and retreat into solitude? Matthew 14 tells us that he had compassion on them. He put them first. He healed their sick. He gave.

This past week, we learned about the widow in Luke 21. Many people were going to the temple to give to God out of their finances. The Bible says that the rich gave “out of their abundance,” meaning, they had so much that their gift was no great sacrifice. Contrast this display to the widow who only gave two small coins. It doesn’t sound like much, but to this widow, who had very little, it was everything she had. We can imagine that the big gifts from the wealthy were what people were watching. Probably no one noticed the widow and her seemingly inconsequential gift. But Jesus noticed. He said to his disciples, “Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put more into the treasury than all the others. They all gave out of their wealth; but she, out of her poverty, put in everything – all she had to live on.” Her gift was a gift of proportion. The widow demonstrated sacrificial giving.

The Bible shows us over and over again how God gives this way to us. He gave His only Son, after all, and as our Bible verse this week described, “Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.”

The Bible doesn’t tell us the widow’s fate. Did she go home, her last means of self-support gone, to wither away and die? I don’t think so. “Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure [ . . . ] will be poured into your lap.” In other words, you reap what you sow.

Here are some of the clay coins the firsties designed to help them remember this moment in Biblical history, to remember to give to others, even when it means missing out on something they want.

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I noticed many examples of sacrificial giving during the week, moments where a student put another first. One washed another’s paint-covered table after art without being asked. One helped a friend tie his shoe. One waited patiently after being called on when a friend bumped his knee and needed a teacher’s immediate attention, giving up her turn. One shared a part of her snack when a friend forgot his at home. One passed a friend the last piece of white paper, even though she was planning to use it herself.

These little moments might not seem like much. They might even go unnoticed by most.

Jesus notices.

 

 

The firsties share their attention with this week’s Star of the Week as he shares about himself, reads a story, and demonstrates his talent.

 

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The firstie saints devote focus to an assortment of scientific research and writing projects throughout the week.

 

The firsties give one another respect and grow patience while taking turns during math workshop and calendar.

100th Day, Groundhog’s Day, Star Wars Day, Oh My!

We have been very busy in the Patience Fruit Stand!

This last week was a week of celebrations. The 100th day of school and Groundhog’s Day both fell on Tuesday, February 2nd, and our school-wide Star Wars Day surprised all the kiddos on Friday!

We ate a snack comprised of 100 items, modeled our 100th day shirts (which were fabulous!), made necklaces of 100 Froot Loops, created hats filled with ten 10-frames, all showing a different way to decompose 10, designed towers of 100 cups, predicted and tested the distance of 100 footsteps, created stories of what it would be like to be 100 years old, and wrote 100 words. Here is a little peek into our 100th Day fun!

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For Groundhog’s Day, we predicted whether or not the groundhog (Ol’ Punxsutawney Phil) would see his shadow. Most of us were right! We predicted that he would not see his shadow and that spring would be coming soon! We also read Groundhog Day by Gail Gibbons and watched a short science video about groundhogs.

Star Wars Day was described as the “best day ever” by several students in the Patience Fruit Stand. From watching an epic battle between Yoda and Darth Vader, to Jedi Training, to creating their own lightsabers, to writing their own space-themed stories (one was about space cats, because, of course), to designing and building their own space ships out of popsicle sticks, to playing Storm Trooper Blast in P.E., to visiting the 6th grade lego museum, it was a funtastic day filled with excitement and learning. Check out some of the fun!

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I had to watch out for the Jawa all day. No one wants to be sold for parts!
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Creating a spaceship masterpiece!
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She was going for a geometric design.

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Hanging out with my best bud, R2D2, and my owner, Master Luke.

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The force is strong with those who enter here.

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Watch out! Lightsaber battles await!
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Storm Trooper Blast probably looked a lot like Dodgeball to the untrained eye.

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Our inspiration during spaceship design.

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At chapel, we learned that the Bible tells us to put on the armor of God and take up our lightsaber (Maybe sword. Probably lightsaber.), which is the Word of God. We learned that God’s Word is the strongest weapon we would ever need against the dark side.

Pick up your lightsabers, everyone. May the force be with you.

We’re “Batty” for First Grade!

One of the things the firsties learned about this week is BATS! We read several nonfiction books and articles about bats and watched a short video clip of the largest bat colony in the world to see how bats swoop and glide. We created bats and learned about all of their parts. Many firsties were surprised to learn that a bat’s wing is really like one large hand with thin skin stretched in between each finger! We learned all about what bats eat, and that although different bats have different diets, none of them like to drink human blood – a few firsties thought they did! Did you know that a bat can eat approximately 600 mosquitos in an hour? The firsties worked in groups to count out 600 mosquitos and serve them up on dinner plates. 🙂 We recorded our learning throughout the week on our bat chart, and used the information we collected to write about bats.

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bats
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Last quarter we learned about community helpers, and since October was also Fire Prevention month, we scheduled a visit to the fire station! We’re so blessed to have a station right across the street. 🙂 We got to tour the entire fire house, and learned so many things about these men and women who serve our community! Inside, we got to see their office, kitchen, weight room, lockers, and bedrooms. Did you know that they sleep and eat in the fire house? Did you know that all the food and other staples they buy to share at work is purchased out-of-pocket? We learned what to do in a fire, not to be scared of the uniform in case of an emergency, and that we should all know our own home address so that emergency responders know where to go! Finally, everyone got to hear the siren and sit behind the wheel of the truck and pretend to drive. Our visit was SO much fun!

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On Friday, we practiced following a recipe and writing instructions for others to follow. We made “Franken-snacks” out of rice krispie treats, icing, and sprinkles, and then wrote about the process. Check out our delicious learning!

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A Short & Sweet Peek at our Week

To wrap up our learning about community helpers, we were visited by our very own principal, Mrs. Stephens, who talked with us about what a principal does all day and answered all of our burning questions. She also shared a hilarious book with us: The Principal from the Black Lagoon. 😉 We learned that although children are not bad, sometimes they make wrong choices and need help solving problems during the day. The principal is a helper who supports us when we need to solve problems, pray, or simply take a break and talk things out.

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Recess is a foundationally important part of a child’s day; in fact, pediatricians say recess is as important for young children as math or reading! Taking a learning break allows the brain to process the information it has taken in during the day, much like sleep. Children simply need downtime in order to do their best. Although recess is necessary for the development of physical gross motor skills, it also deeply affects social, emotional, and cognitive development as well. Unstructured play gives children the opportunity to develop conflict resolution skills that they otherwise would not. Then they’re ready to come back to class, able to learn and focus on challenging material. At CCA, we protect recess time as a valued period of free play. In the Patience Fruit Stand, the firsties devise their own games and activities, and are able to use the playground freely to swing, run, climb, slide, pretend, and even build or create.

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Remember the pumpkin we began investigating last week? This week we used the seeds we scooped out to practice making and counting sets of 10. Each group of students was given a large sheet of butcher paper and a plateful of pumpkin seeds. They grouped the seeds by 10s, circling and labeling their work on their butcher paper as they counted. Finally, we collected each group’s data and added each group’s number of seeds together to find the total number of seeds inside our pumpkin. We discovered that our pumpkin had exactly 300 seeds inside!20151013_115445 20151013_115500 20151013_115721

After counting all those seeds, we’d worked up an appetite! We followed a pumpkin seed baking recipe step by step, measuring out the necessary ingredients and setting a timer so we’d know when they were done.

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Most of us enjoyed our final taste test!

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We let our pumpkin sit for a week after opening it to collect the seeds. Finally, it was time to investigate what happens to a pumpkin over time. The photographs do not begin to truly show the full “ick” factor, y’all. Our friends thought the strings of moldy yuck looked like cat hair. Shudder. There were “eeeeeeewws” all around! In general, we try to remember that scientists don’t say “eew,” but in this case, it was warranted!

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We learned a lot about the natural process of rot and decay. Now our pumpkin rests outside, by the fence on the edge of our playground so that we can continue to observe its changes over a long period of time!

“For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven: a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted; a time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up; a time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance; a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing; a time to seek, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away; a time to tear, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak; a time to love, and a time to hate; a time for war, and a time for peace.” – Ecclesiastes 3:1-8